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History Curriculum 2020 2021

Intent:

At the Federation of Bedenham and Holbrook Primary Schools we provide a history curriculum which is accessible for all our children.

We strongly believe that high quality history lessons inspire children to be curious about the past and that this motivates them to learn, think and act like historians. A particular area for development for 2020 / 21 is ensuring that our children are aware of chronological order of the periods of history they study and through using visual prompts, we aim to ensure that our children are aware what came before, what came after and if there were any overlaps.

Our carefully thought out History curriculum allows the children to develop and build upon their existing subject knowledge, skills and understanding whilst also promoting their spiritual, moral, social, cultural and resilience development which prepares them for Key Stage 3 and beyond. It is our aim that through our careful planning our children have the opportunity to revise previous units and this will in time support our children’s ability to transfer their knowledge into their long-term memory.

Through carefully using the enquiry based cycle and our enthusiastic learner enquiry wheel our children will have an opportunity to:

Ø Develop a sense of curiosity about the past through looking at a range of artefacts and resources

Ø Learn about periods of History in chronological order as they progress through the school

Ø establish how and why people interpret the past in different ways

Ø understand the changes in within living and beyond living memory

Ø learn about significant people of the past and events that helped shape our world today

Ø understand the methods of historical and;

Ø Pose questions and answer them

Also, we aim to increase and develop our children’s historical skills by immersing them in rich tasks that allow them to manipulate artefacts, plan visits that links with what we’re teaching and invite visitors in to share their wealth of knowledge with our children. Furthermore, we endeavour to plan purposeful outcomes that will enable our children to share what they have learnt.

In addition, the subject lead will liaise with phase leaders to ensure that trips and visitors are weaved into each learning journey to ensure that our children have the opportunity to explore what history can be witnessed in the local area, as well as well as further afield.

Finally, we shall ensure that our learning environments are vocabulary rich and there is key progression from Key Stage 1 to Key Stage 2, so that our children speak like historians.

 

Year 1/2 Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2

 

 

Queens:

During this unit, the children will be comparing the lives of Elizabeth I, Queen Victoria and Elizabeth II. Within this unit the children will follow the six step enquiry in order to be able to:

Chronology:
• State when each Queen was on the throne and place this on a blank timeline.
• Attempts to make simple timelines to sequence processes, events and objects within their own life / Confidently uses vocabulary when referring to the past (old and new, then and now)

Change/Continuity:
• Identify the changes in transport and the way information was spread between the three Queen’s reign.
• Can match old objects to people or situations in the past.
• Can describe in simple terms how elements of the past were different.

Historical significance:
• Look at different sources and comment on how significant each Queen was and what legacy they left behind.
• Can recognise and describe special times or events for family or friends.

Outcome:
• Create a museum display about the three Queens but can only choose five items to display for each Queen.

Great Fire of London:

During this unit, the children will be investigating what caused the Great Fire of London and what changes were made nationally as a result of this Historical event. Within this unit the children will follow the six step enquiry in order to be able to:

Chronology:
• Place events on a timeline in order to retell story orally / via picture prompts
• Realises that historians use dates to describe key events /
• Use phrases describing intervals of time (before, after, at the same time) /
• Sequence artefacts /photographs from different periods of life.

Characteristic features:
• Explore the building materials that were used at the time and the firefighting methods – how responsible were they for the fire spreading?
• Starts to understand that buildings, clothing, transport or technology could have been different in the past.

Cause and consequence:
• Identify the causes of the fire and its spread – what changes were made when London was rebuilt? Are any of these methods used today?
• Can describe in simples terms the causes and / or consequences of an important historical event / Offer more than one example of how it turned out.

Historical interpretation:
• Explore a range of sources (written and pictorial) How many people lost their lives? Did the number differ from source to source?
• Can identify and talk about differences in accounts relating to people or events both from the time at happened and present.

Year 3/4 A Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2

 

Anglo Saxons:

During this unit, the children will be investigating what impact the Anglo Saxons had on the world. Within this unit the children will follow the six step enquiry in order to be able to:

Chronology:
• Create a timeline / map to show when and why they left their homeland.
• Begin to understand that historical periods overlap one another and vary in length.
• Use more precise vocabulary when explaining what came before and what came after.

Change & Continuity – Why the change to Christianity from Paganism?
• Can describe and give examples why changes at particular times occurred while other things stay the same
• Can explain why the changes in different places might be connected

Cause and consequence:
Consider why did the Anglo Saxons came to Britain? What did they hope to achieve? Why / how they converted to Christianity?
• Can describe in simples terms the causes and / or consequences of an important historical event.
• Offer more than one example of how it turned out.

Historical Significance:
What was the Anglo Saxons legacy? What still remains to this day?
• Can identify significance reveals something about history.

Historical interpretation:
Does Alfred the Great deserve his title? Was he great or just lucky?
• Can describe how different interpretations arise.
• Understand that historical understanding is always being revised.

Vikings

During this unit, the children will be investigating whether the Vikings were greater than the Anglo Saxons.. Within this unit the children will follow the six step enquiry in order to be able to:

Chronology:
• Create a timeline to determine where the Vikings came from and where they travelled to:
• Begin to understand that historical periods overlap one another and vary in length.
• Use more precise vocabulary when explaining what came before and what came after.

Characteristic features:
• Establish what was life like as a Viking – what were the successes / obstacles that stood in their path.
• Can identify the main features associated with the period / civilization studied.

Cause and consequence:
• Research to establish whether the Vikings were traders or raiders?
• Can describe with simple examples different types of causes seeing that events happen for different reasons not just human actions.

Historical interpretation:
Examine sources both pictorial and written and decide whether Vikings – are murderous thugs?
• Understands that different accounts occur and why people might give them
• Understands that some interpretations are more reliable than others.

Year 5/6 A Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2

 

Crime and Punishment

This is a British Study that explores how the crime and punishment system has changed, considering whether all the changes made were successful / fair? . Within this unit the children will follow the six step enquiry in order to be able to:

Chronology:
• Sequence the crimes and punishments that occurred through time.
• Accurately place civilizations studied in chronological order.
• Can take into consideration that periods of History overlap and offer what impact this had.

Change & Continuity:
• Explore what changes to the crime and punishment system had on civilians and examine the impact this had on people that lived at the time.
• Understands that there is usually a combination of reasons why things change and considers what might have been the biggest factor.
• Understands that the changes do not affect everyone in the same way.

Cause & Consequence:
• Consider the short term and long term impact the changes had in the period studied.
• Can explain consequences in terms of immediate and longer term effects that a key event might trigger.
• Can make links between the causes that make an event occur.

Ancient Egyptians

This is a study to establish the impact the Egyptians had on the world in order to interpret what legacy they left behind. Within this unit the children will follow the six step enquiry in order to be able to:

Chronology:
• Use a variety of sources to add relevant events / dates to a timeline.
• Accurately place civilizations studied in chronological order.
• Can take into consideration that periods of History overlap and offer what impact this had.

Characteristic features:
• Interpret what life like as an Egyptian – what Ancient Egyptian influences still exist today?
• Can compare and make some significant links between civilizations / periods studied.
• Can give detailed explanations for the connections between ways of life in different civilizations.

Historic interpretation:
• Compare accounts of events from different sources – fact or fiction? Offer some reasons for the discrepancies that may occur between the sources.
• Understands that different accounts occur and why people might give them.
• Understands that some interpretations are more reliable than others.

Historical enquiry:
• Questions to be focused on astronomy, maths or medicine and the legacies that the Ancient Egyptians left behind.
• Can construct reasoned arguments about events, periods or civilizations studied.
• Can question source reliability and why they give conflicting information.